The value of Academic Honesty is highly valued at IB at Bartow High School. All students receive instruction in a culture which strongly promotes the value of academic integrity. Students are committed to creating and developing course work which is their own intellectual property. They learn to use only authorized aid and assistance and to appropriately reference primary and secondary sources following MLA or APA writing styles determined by the course. Our school’s culture prohibits any act of academic malpractice.

As young adults preparing for university studies or entry into the workforce, Diploma Programme students both enjoy the freedom and bear the responsibility of studying in a course that emphasizes independence and self-reliance. The IB staff recognizes that the 21st century learner has an abundance of information at their fingertips at all times. This unprecedented access makes it imperative that systems are in place to teach the young learners the importance of academic ethics. The purpose of the written Academic Honesty Policy is to describe academic honesty as it relates to the Bartow High School community to define breaches of academic honesty, and to outline the school’s response should academic dishonesty occur.

Academic Resources And Support
Starting in the 2015 – 2016 school year, all IB students were required to upload coursework into the plagiarism filtering software, Turnitin.com, prior to submission to the teacher for a grade. If the software detects the student participated in academic malpractice, the progressive discipline system begins. This expectation includes IB Internal Assessment projects and IB core requirements, such as the Extended Essay, the Theory of Knowledge Essay and the CAS portfolio. These documents are vetted prior to grading and submitting to the International Baccalaureate for assessment. However, the staff recognizes that Turnitin.com is a purchased service. It is a teaching tool to assist in the development of students with a highly effective understanding of acceptable academic practices. This service is used proactively to foster academic honesty understanding and participation in our students of all grade levels.  IB teachers and the IB Coordinator monitor student submissions and assist teachers in uploading documents. If the staff is alerted to a possible malpractice, the progressive discipline measures will be followed.

Academic Malpractice Defined
Cheating includes plagiarism, collusion, duplication of work, misconduct during an examination and the disclosure of information on any examination, etc. Cheating is broadly defined as any behaviors which are used to gain unfair academic advantage. Examples are the falsifying of records, the use of technology to gain answers, the utilization of notes in a test without permission, allowing another person (friends, parents, tutors, etc.) to do work identified as the student’s. Plagiarism is defined as submitting another person’s work and identifying it as their own. This includes any work submitted without a citation giving credit to the creator of the intellectual property.

Misconduct Relating to Examinations
Misconduct occurring during any form of assessment related to DP and non DP courses includes, but not limited to, the following:

  • The copying of another person’s work without citation.
  • The theft of any examination documents.
  • Knowingly using unauthorized materials or information during an examination.
  • The use of technology to gain advantage during an examination.
  • Any attempt to compromise the attention of another candidate during an examination.
  • Knowingly exchanging information about the examination before and within 24 hours of taking the examination.


Progressive Discipline

The progressive discipline process following a breach of the Academic Honesty policy is as follows:

  • First Offense:
    • A zero is given for the assignment.
    • A discipline referral is entered into the school’s student management system.
    • The teacher calls the parent of the student within a 24 hour period of knowledge of the breach.
    • The IB Coordinator is informed of the breach and the actions taken by the teacher.
    • Offenses occurring during an IB examination will result in the candidate’s loss of the IB score for that examination.
  • Second Offense:
    • A zero is given for the assignment.
    • A discipline referral is entered into the school’s student management system.
    • The IB Coordinator is informed of the breach and the actions taken by the teacher.
    • The IB Coordinator schedules a parent, teacher, coordinator conference. The student’s other teachers may be included depending on the situation.
    • The student will be placed on Academic Probation as evidenced by a contract signed by the student, parent and IB Coordinator during the conference.
    • Offenses occurring during an IB examination will result in the candidate’s loss of the IB score for that examination.
    • Potential removal from the course.
  • Third Offense:
    • A zero is given for the assignment.
    • A discipline referral is entered into the school’s student management system.
    • The IB Coordinator is informed of the breach and the actions taken by the teacher.
    • The IB Coordinator schedules a parent, teacher, coordinator conference. The student’s other teachers may be included depending on the situation. Review of the Academic Honesty Contract during the conference.
    • Offenses occurring during an IB examination will result in the candidate’s loss of the IB score for that examination.
    • Potential removal from the course.
    • Potential removal from the IB Programme.

Academic misconduct occurring during IB examinations will result in the student receiving a null score for the examination and an incomplete grade from IB for that subject. IB Candidates will forfeit their opportunity to receive the IB Diploma. To clarify, this policy includes all work in the IB Programme, including the Extended Essay, Theory of Knowledge and CAS.

Annual Review of the Policy
The Academic Honesty Policy undergoes an annual review to ensure it is meeting the needs and expectations of all stakeholders. The committee reviewing the policy will include: IB teachers, IB  Coordinator and the IB School Counselor. The review commences in the Spring Semester for the upcoming school year.

Communication of the Policy
The final version is communicated through the following resources:

  • Students and their parents sign an Academic Honesty Contract which includes a link to this policy during the first week of school.
  • It is placed on the IB at Bartow High School Website in July.
  • A link to the Academic Honesty Policy is delivered electronically through our weekly IB Constant Contact for one month when school starts.
  • Students are walked through each part of the policy during the first week of school. The administration and IB Coordinator conduct individual Grade Level assemblies the first week of school to disseminate all policies to all students.
  • Incoming 9th graders are given a clearly worded presentation during their Spring Orientation which occurs in April or May of their 8th grade year. A copy is provided to the parents during this orientation.
  • Copies of the policy are available for review in the IB Office.

We adhere to the vision that every student who graduates from the IB Diploma Program at Bartow High School is prepared for university and career opportunities. We believe our students are empowered to thrive in a global society by experiencing a relevant learning environment which inspires critical thinking, mindfulness, problem solving and innovation. Demands are high and students must be committed to consistently devote time and energy to their studies.

The IB program expects students to excel to their maximum potential academically, socially, and in extra-curricular activities. Due to the rigor of the program, and out-of-school requirements, participation in the IB program is a family commitment. Students are expected to enter the program with their personal goal of success.

Prospective Students Eligibility Profile for IB at Bartow High School
The admissions policies and procedures of the International Baccalaureate at Bartow High School are developed and implemented by Polk County Schools.

The criteria set by our school district are as follows:

  • Middle School Grade Point Average of a 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale.
  • Successful completion of Algebra 1 and the End-of-Course state assessment.
  • Math Concordant Scores for Algebra 1 If not currently enrolled in a public school or cannot take the EOC until July 2020, the following assessments are accepted: PSAT/NMSQT Math 430, SAT Math 420 or ACT Math 16
  • Students are required to have permanent residency in the IB @ BHS zone (West Side of Polk County) https://www.polk-fl.net/schools/zf.asp
  • Applications are accepted through www.PolkEdOptions.com during the school district’s Open Enrollment period. Open Enrollment for 2019-2020 was November 1, 2018-January 11, 2019.
  • After applying on the site, applicants are given information on where to take the assessment.
  • Parents and students are invited to call the district’s Office of Acceleration and Innovation at 863-534-0631 for more information on the application process.

Procedure After Applying For Admission:

  • Students will take an assessment and be admitted based on their rank score.
  • To prevent a biased selection, the names of the student applicants are temporarily removed, assigned a number and placed in rank order.
  • Students are selected based on their ranked test score and the available seats in the 9th grade.

Procedure After Acceptance into the IB at Bartow High School:

  • Selected 8th grade applicants receive communication from the Office of Acceleration and Innovation by the end of March. Families notify the school of their decision to attend by the due date on the letter.
  • Families who accept the invitation to attend are invited to attend an Incoming Freshman Orientation in April. A plethora of information on the IB Policies, expectations, etc. are given to students and their parents. Students register for their 9th grade classes through a personalized process.

Assessment Philosophy and Principles

The philosophy of our school is to develop an assessment process which enhances student learning. The process is to include the monitoring and evaluation of student progress towards meeting course and IB Diploma Program standards. We monitor and evaluate student progress toward meeting the school’s established school-wide learning outcomes. We provide feedback to students, parents, and other stakeholders. We gather evidence to support teacher reflection on their instructional practices. Through this process we inform curriculum review and evaluate the suitability of courses. This philosophy includes the constant reflection to aid in the development of both short and long-term achievement goals for IB at Bartow High School.

  • Assessment is the method utilized to determine the knowledge of our students.
    • Individual assessments range from informal conversations with students in classrooms to periodic written quizzes, tests, and essays to the IB exams in May each year.
    • While some of these assessments are considered summative assessments, they are designed to give a final mark indicating achievement in a course.
    • Other assessments may be used in a formative manner by teachers within our IB Programme.
    • We make adjustments to our instruction from minute to minute, day to day, month to month, and year to year based on the information quality assessments provide.
  •  We believe all students can learn and will achieve in every subject they study.
    • Assessments assist educators in determining student progress in such endeavors.
    • Varying those assessments ensure every student has multiple opportunities to demonstrate their capabilities and achievements.
    • It is essential students receive timely feedback to allow them to reflect and make adjustments to their knowledge before misconceptions are cemented.

Assessment Practices

  • Assessments are standardized in the measurement of the quality of student work. Exceptions are made for students with learning disabilities.
  • As a manner of reporting achievement to parents and students, teachers mark student work and record it in FOCUS, the online grade recording platform used by our school district.
    • At that point, every student and parent has log-in credentials which allow access to current progress at any time from any web browser.
    • Parents can arrange for email notifications of their children’s grades.
    • In the middle of each quarter, interim reports may be distributed per request. At the end of each quarter, paper report cards are issued.
    • Twice a year, credits are awarded for classes which have been successfully completed at the end of the semester.
  • Our school reports grades on a 0-100, A- F scale as required by the state of Florida.
    • At the top of the scale is A, with a percentage of scores from 90 to 100.
    • The grade of a B has a percentage of scores from 80 to 89. The grade of a C has a percentage of scores from 70 to 79.
    • The grade of D has a percentage of scores from 60 to 69. The grade of F has a percentage of scores below a 59 which results in credit not being awarded due to failing the course.
    • These grades are converted to a grade point scale that is used for class ranking.
      ▪ The Polk County Student Progression Plan details the computation of grade point averages and class ranking for graduation.
      ▪ It can be found at polk-fl.com.
  • Classes assign homework to reinforce the material students learn in class.
    • Out-of-class assignments are meant to reinforce and extend classroom instruction while providing the instructor the opportunity to evaluate the student’s acquisition of concepts independent of direct observation.
    • In addition to these assignments, students often complete work for the diploma outside of class (math projects and explorations, science lab reports, the extended essay and Theory of Knowledge paper, etc. .)

Understanding the use of our Diploma Programme assessment Criteria
All teachers are required to be familiar with the criteria and markschemes used by the IB in assessing both internally and externally assessed components of the diploma courses that they teach.

  • Teachers learn IB requirements through IB teacher and moderator training workshops, IB Prepared course books, discussions on the Online Curriculum Center, vertical alignments with experienced colleagues in their academic departments, etc.
  • This method of scoring is shared with the students and used on some of their class assignments.

The importance of effective Formative and Summative Assessments

  • Formative assessments are utilized on a daily basis in classes to measure student knowledge and experience. This information is used to determine if learning targets are met. Teachers use a variety of assessment forms from verbal assessments to pre-tests that monitor student learning. Based on the results of the formative assessments, students, parents, teachers and school staff can evaluate student achievement and make adjustments. Types of formative assessment include, but are not limited to, daily assignments, quizzes, labs, projects, and discussions.
  • Summative assessments are given at the end of a curricular unit or concept for the purpose of evaluating learning mastery. Teachers use a variety of assessment methods such as presentations, projects, portfolios, and paper tests. These instruments assess the level of mastery demonstrated by the student. The level of mastery is determined using a rubric for the assessment and the grade is recorded.
    • Summative assessments include IB exams, Advanced Placement exams, Florida End of Course exams, Polk County Schools End of Year exams, Florida Standards Assessment exams, teacher-developed classroom unit assessments, semester exams, the IB Group 4 project, IB internal assessments, extended essays, Theory of Knowledge papers, Group 1 literature papers, and more.
    • Students take a variety of college entrance and scholarship exams; every student takes one or more of the SAT, ACT, PSAT/NMSQT, ACT, Aspire, Florida Postsecondary Education Readiness Test and SAT Subject Tests.

Internal and External International Baccalaureate Assessments

  • Internal assessments are mandatory assessments completed during the 11th and 12th grade that focus on skills as well as the curricular content. The teacher grades these assessments using a rubric published by IB. The internal assessment scores are submitted to IB for moderation to ensure all internal assessment scores worldwide are consistent. Examples of this type of assessment include: oral presentations, science lab reports, math portfolios, etc. Internal assessments can serve as both classroom assignments which contribute to the students’ grades.
  • External assessments are mandatory assessments which are given during the 11th and 12th grade. These assessments are not scored by the course teacher. These assessments are IB exams that are administered during the May testing session and essays that are sent directly to IB examiners for evaluation. All IB students take these exams on the assigned date. Unlike Advanced Placement exams, there are no alternative test dates given for IB exams.
  • The process for recording and reporting Diploma Programme assessments occurs internally. Each teacher provides the marks which are verified by the IB Coordinator. Uploads are completed by the teacher and IB Coordinator.

Admission-related Assessments

  • Assessment in the program begins with the entrance process.
    • Public school eighth grade students with a middle school grade point average of 3.5 or above receive a letter of invitation to a prospective student orientation; a letter is sent to headmasters of private schools to distribute to their students who have the minimum grade point average; the district publicizes the meetings for families who home school their students.
    • Interested students then take the Stanford Achievement Test version 10 (or other assessment specified by the school district).
    • Students are ranked by the SAT10 scores, and the top 70 to 80 percent are selected for admission.
    • Additional students are invited to attend should the previous students decline admission.
  • Students must successfully complete the first two years of our Pre-IB program to continue as students in the Diploma Program at Bartow High School. This includes earning appropriate credits and maintaining a minimum 2.5 unweighted grade point average during their freshman and sophomore years.
  • To encourage the development of a language in which students are not already fluent, students whose home language is other than English are tested for fluency; those who test as fluent are not provided the option to take that language as their Language B or Acquisition Language.
  • Students identified as having special education needs through their Individual Educational Plans or 504 plans receive additional accommodations to be academically successful.

Updating and Communicating the Assessment Policy

  • Each school year, the Diploma Program Coordinator will appoint a committee of at least three DP teachers, at least one of who did not serve on that committee in the previous school year, to revisit this policy and ensure that it still reflects the practices and principles underlying assessment at the school. Revisions approved by the committee and the Diploma Program Coordinator become part of the school’s official assessment policy.
  • Teachers new to the Bartow High School IB programme will be directed to the IB school’s website to familiarize themselves with the Assessment Policy. The IB Coordinator will review the policy with the new teachers and answer questions as they arise.
  • Communication of the Assessment Policy is part of the New School Year staff professional development. All teachers are required to review the policy as part of their opening procedures. Students and parents are briefed on the location of the Assessment Policy during our orientations. The Assessment Policy is located on the school’s website. All school policies are sent to our subscribers through our school’s Constant Contact at the beginning of the school year.

Students take written examinations at the end of the programme, which are marked by external IB examiners. Students also complete assessment tasks in the school, which are either initially marked by teachers and then moderated by external moderators or sent directly to external examiners.

The diploma is awarded to students who gain at least 24 points, subject to certain minimum levels of performance across the whole programme and to satisfactory participation in the creativity, action, service requirement. The highest total that a programme student can be awarded is 45 points. The programme has three core requirements that are included to broaden the educational experience and challenge students to apply their knowledge and understanding.

IB at Bartow High School carries a zero tolerance policy for bullying on school campus. Polk Schools Information

Introduction, Purpose and Profile

In accordance with the International Baccalaureate Organization, the purpose of this document is to:

  1. Communicate the expectations for students to acquire language growth while attending the International Baccalaureate at Bartow High School
  2. Provide guidelines by defining the language instruction policies and services offered in context with the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme.
  3. Provide a review of the available

The International Baccalaureate School at Bartow High School invites students from a large population of medium to small cities in the rural areas in central Florida. The predominant language spoken is English, with Spanish as the second most common language. In addition, other languages spoken by students at home include Arabic, Bengali, Bisaya, Burmese, Cantonese, Czech, French, German, Greek, Gujarati, Haitian Creole, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Malayalam, Mandarin (Chinese), Marathi, Polish. Punjabi, Tagalog, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Urdu, and Welsh. Our IB programme is delivered in English, except for Language B classes, which are delivered in target languages. Languages offered as Language B are Spanish, French, Japanese and German.

Applicants are chosen to attend IB based on grade point average, state test scores and an essay. Upon admission to the 9th grade they choose a Language B. Students who are native speakers of any Language B offerings are required to study a different language, Students begin with Level 1 except those who have already earned Level 1 credit through middle school or a virtual school. Those students begin the 9th grade with Level 2, and our Spanish program is a five-year program. French and German are four-year programs.

Multiple supports are available for students whose mother tongue is not English. ESOL services are available, including periodic assessment, translation of school documents, interpreters for parents, and special English literacy classes in the Bartow High School program. Our teachers are certified to teach ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages).

Language Philosophy

All teachers are language teachers. Language is the primary means of learning and communicating. The language acquisition is to be promoted as a partnership between all members of our community including parents, students, teachers and staff. Learning a World Language is an integral part of becoming a global citizen. Mother tongue languages help for cultural and personal identity and should be respected.

IB at Bartow High School reflects the interests of students and our teaching community through rigorous academic programs, extracurricular activities, parent involvement and numerous opportunities for success. The predominant language spoken is English and it is also the language of instruction for all students and teachers of IB at Bartow High School, except for the world language classes which are taught in the target language: French, German and Spanish. As instructors, we address the importance for IB learners to become good communicators and stress the relevance of expressing their ideas in a variety of modes in more than one language which reflects the world we live in and as an essential component of an international program.

All teachers at Bartow High are required to have 20 hours of Exceptional Student Education in-service and English As A Second Language (ESOL) training is also required to better support all students.

Our Language B objectives are to:

  • Enable the students to understand and use the studied language in diverse contexts, emphasizing multiple purposes.
  • Enable students to understand and use written and oral language skillfully.
  • Promote, through the study of texts and social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of different perspectives of diverse peoples.
  • Make students aware of the role that language plays in relation to other areas of knowledge.
  • Create opportunities for entertainment, creativity and intellectual pursuits with the use of the target language.
  • Give students the base to use a Language B for other studies, work or leisure pursuits.
  • Make students aware of the relation between languages and the cultures they represent. (Lengua B, 2004. Organizacion del Bachillerato Internacional, p 7.)

Teachers do this through current professional practices aimed at producing interpersonal, presentational and interpretive proficiency. Instruction and assessment are geared to these proficiencies and IB guidelines are used for in-course assessment.

Strategies to support all teacher in their contribution to the language development of students:

Language skills are used every day in every class. English is the language of instruction except for Language B classes which are conducted primarily in the target language. Most classes require research, written assignments, and presentations. Language A is reinforced in all Language B classes by reinforcing grammatical concepts, noting cognate vocabulary, and using Language A for translation. Curriculum overlaps between subjects reinforcing vocabulary and concepts in all classes.

Support for Mother Tongue:

Our faculty recognizes and celebrates our multi-cultural, multi-linguistic backgrounds and the fact that many are already “balanced bilinguals”. During class, students are encouraged to bring in their own language experiences and cultural observations to share with all other students. This practice supports the students’ mother tongue while helping to promote a global perspective among all our students.

By attending a public high school in a semi-rural Central Florida, students whose mother tongue is not English, learn or expand their knowledge of the host country, its culture and traditions. Regional accents are heard through some of their peers and, in some cases, their instructors. For many of these students, they come and go between this truly “American” setting to their homes and their “mother tongues,” reinforcing this notion of balanced bilingualism.

Support for students who are not proficient in the language of instruction:

A variety of supports are available for students whose mother tongue is not English. English As A Second Language (ESOL) services are available within the Bartow High School program including periodic assessment, translation of school documents, interpreters for parents and special English literacy classes. An ESOL coordinator is on the Bartow High school staff to oversee language development of those students not yet at the level to participate fully in the classroom. This coordinator also provides resources for teachers in meeting the students’ language needs.

Learning of the host country or regional language and culture:
A variety of strategies are used to engage our families who speak languages other than English in their homes. Our World Language teachers, support staff and student leaders serve as translators. This is mostly used with our Spanish-speaking families. This population has increased significantly in our school over the past 5 years. We utilize the expertise of the learners in our community to help us communicate with our families about upcoming school events, important academic opportunities for students and concerns about student progress in school. School documents are translated and school phone messages are translated into Spanish. We have translation services at our school for events including Open House, Parent/Teacher Conferences, etc.

Our extra-curricular language and culture opportunities for student is abundant. The following clubs are available to all Bartow High School students interested in enriching their experiences in their mother tongue or their additional languages. We aim to increase the participant’s cultural and international mindedness. The clubs are: French, Spanish, German, Multi-cultural and UN Club.

The Language Options for Groups 1 and 2:

Language A:
The IB School at Bartow High School acknowledges the importance of teaching and learning language throughout the curriculum. It is through this important tool that associations are made by students in their various subjects. Language A is limited to the English language. Students are instructed in English syntax, grammar, communication skills and literacy in all IB classes. All students are involved in Language A learning from grades nine through twelve. This curriculum is aligned with the requirements of the Polk County Public School, Florida Standards and the International Baccalaureate Language A objectives.

Language B:
Emphasis is placed on the development of the four learning modalities (listening, speaking, reading and writing) practiced within given contexts and linked to the three modes of communication (interpersonal communication, interpretive communication, and presentational communication) as a fundamental part of the language practice. Language structures, through oral practice of grammatical forms in context and through explicit instruction, allow students to use the correct grammar via questioning and discussion.

Reading is completed throughout the lesson using sentences, short stories, and multi-media resources on a variety of topics and magazine ads. Various exercises are completed in class as a way to achieve grammatical accuracy. These instructional resources elicit in students responses such as: making generalizations, giving an opinion, determining the main idea, distinguishing between fact and opinion, drawing conclusions, etc.

Listening is constantly reinforced through different media, such as text-book related listening activities, chapter-content videos, cultural videos (following a conversation between native speakers including colloquial expressions), oral reports or other types of narratives.

Students verbally communicate their ideas in their target language. Students are provided the opportunity to discuss in small groups and in oral presentations. Students are able to narrate, describe and explain in the past and present tenses with appropriate grammatical structures. Additionally, there are projects presented orally. Students practice timed oral activities based on general topics of conversation where they have the opportunity to express facts, ideas, and feelings in a manner that is intelligible to the specific audience. The use of the language is practiced in different situations, such as critiquing, advising, questioning, etc.

Writing is an important part of daily instruction. Students write paragraphs and essays in accordance with their learning levels. Students write without the aid of a dictionary and participate in timed writings. The tests and quizzes assess all four language skills. A variety of modes are used in developing this skill, including narrative (personal experience); expository (essay, paper); persuasive (brochures, instructions); and formal and informal letters. These writing activities help students develop personal writing styles.

The Language Policy is Revised and Implemented:

Incoming students receive guidelines on the Language B policies during IB Freshman Orientation prior to enrolling in classes. Office personnel and language B teachers monitor the registration period to ensure students have not chosen a home language as their Language B. Teachers who teach different levels of the same language meet regularly to discuss current assessment and correlate those assessments with IB strands. These teachers are also given common planning periods to facilitate planning together. The IB teachers write lesson plans which include strategies for teaching students with special learning needs and are reviewed by an IB school administrator. All Language B teachers have attended multiple IB trainings to learn current Diploma Program expectations. They apply this knowledge when revising the Language A or B policies.

The IB at Bartow High School’s Diploma Programme Language Policy will be reviewed by IB staff, school administration, and IB Language Policy Committee members at the beginning of each academic school year. During this revision, students were polled to obtain a current list of home languages. Teachers of other courses were also consulted to learn how Language A is reinforced in their classes.

Communication to Stakeholders:

The International Baccalaureate at Bartow High School Diploma Programme Language Policy is posted on the school’s website, sent in the IB Constant Contact at the beginning of the school year and, if requested, will be made available in hard copy form.

The International Baccalaureate School at Bartow High School from a large population of medium to small cities and rural areas in Central Florida. The predominant language spoken is English, with Spanish as the second most common language. In addition, other languages spoken by students at home include Arabic, Bengali, Bisaya, Burmese, Cantonese, Czech, Efik, French, German, Greek, Gujarati, Haitian Creole, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Malayalam, Mandarin (Chinese), Marathi, Polish. Punjabi, Tagalog, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Urdu, and Welsh. Our IB program is delivered in English, except for Language B classes, delivered in target languages. Languages offered as Language B are Spanish, French and German. Read full Language Policy

Students with excused absences may make up missed assignments as per the teacher’s requirements. Student may bring in the written excuse to the attendance office when they return to campus. All missed work must be made up within two session following the absence unless special arrangements are made by the teacher (generally for longer absences).If the absence is pre-arranged, the student must return the Pre-Approved Absence form at least 5 days before the absence. If the absence is unexcused, no makeup work will be accepted.

The International Baccalaureate School at Bartow High School believes it is important to provide for the needs of students in four areas: academic, emotional, social, and physical. The diversity of our IB programme is inclusive of learners in need of a variety of accommodations. Such special needs are discovered, provided and closely monitored to ensure our students receive the best academic experience. This internal personalization of the pedagogical and curricular structures enhance our students’ academic experience and chances for success in the continuum of international education.

Goals of Special Education Needs Policy

  • Compliance with all national, state, and local laws as related to The Exceptional Student Education policies and procedures for meeting the needs of students in our school.
  • Provide services required to accommodate the individual needs of students.
  • Document and communicate the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders.

The identification of Student Needs

  • Student needs are identified primarily in the 9th grade through notification to the school counselor by the parent referrals, previous school or teacher observations.
  • When special needs are identified, the counselor meets with an advisory team consisting of, but not limited to, school counselor, student, parents, teachers and selected professionals appropriate to the student needs addressed.
  • The team’s recommendations are implemented in the appropriate classrooms, during assessments, and monitored for success, with adjustments being made where necessary.

Individual Educational Plans (IEP), 504 Rehabilitation Plans and English as a Second Language Learner (ELL)

  • All IB staff participate in the following of all documented accommodations for identified students as required by law.
  • Students who enter the program previously identified as “English as a Second Language Learner” (ELL) will receive additional services to adapt to the English language as required by law.

The Gifted Education Program

  • Students identified as “Gifted” upon arrival as 9th graders are provided with Gifted Consultation.
  • The students not identified as gifted upon entry into 9th grade are evaluated through teacher recommendation to participate in a Gifted screening. All freshman not previously identified as Gifted, receive screening from the Gifted Resource Teacher.

Assessments

  • Teachers will utilize a variety of formative assessments to monitor the individual student learning needs and differentiate instruction.
  • Teachers will develop and utilize summative assessments which are differentiated to provide the necessary modifications to accurately gauge student learning.
  • Documented accommodations will be provided for students on all formative and summative assessments.
  • During registration for IB examinations, form D-2 is submitted to the IB Assessment Center for evaluation and recommendation of appropriate testing modifications. If approved, such modifications are then implemented for the appropriate exam and examination site.

Responsibilities for Students with Special Education Needs: The School Counselor

  • The counseling needs for the students evolve over the four years the student is with the IB program.
    • Initially, the freshman and sophomore students’ needs involve assistance adjusting to the program and its rigorous curriculum, learning organizational study skills, and college and career planning such as college admissions and scholarship procedures.
    • The counselor conducts classroom guidance lessons with all freshmen as an orientation to help the students adapt to the IB program.
    • The counselor and freshman teachers meet quarterly to assess students’ needs and may facilitate student and parent conferences for problem solving purposes.
    • During the sophomore year, classroom guidance is centered on taking a preliminary college entrance exam.
    • Junior year classroom guidance visits encourage the students to take the ACT and SAT in a timely manner and the junior conferences, to which parents are invited, is a time to explore post-secondary institutions, careers and upcoming requirements for the IB program.
    • By senior year, the counselor visits classrooms to update students on scholarship opportunities and the college application process.
    • The counselor sends group emails regularly to keep both the students and parents informed of all upcoming school events, service timelines and other pertinent information that is necessary to the success of the students.

Responsibilities for Students with Special Education Needs: The IB Teacher

  • It is the responsibility of the teacher of IB students to adhere to all school, district, state and national laws regarding the education of exceptional students.
  • The teacher of IB students will remain in constant communication with the IB Coordinator regarding the needs of students with accommodations.
  • The IB teacher will implement the accommodations precisely as written in the Individual Education Plans.
  • The IB teacher is part of the committee formed to analyze and determine the needs of the student. It is expected that the IB teacher participate in these committee meetings.
  • The confidentiality of the student and their family is expected from all stakeholders.
  • The teacher will follow the prescribed system of record keeping.

Responsibilities for Students with Special Education Needs: The IB Parent

  • Parents will participate actively in the education of their child.
  • Parents will know and adhere to the school district policy regarding student exceptional education services.
  • Any changes in the students accommodations will be communicated to the school by the parent.
  • Parents will provide the documentation needed for accommodation requests through IB.

Responsibilities for Students with Special Education Needs: The IB Student

  • Students will accurately and actively communicate with their teachers and reach out for assistance when needed.
  • Students will actively participate in their classes and follow the instructions of their teachers.

Annual Review of the Policy

The Special Education Needs/Inclusive Education Policy undergoes an annual review to ensure it is meeting the needs and expectations of all stakeholders. The committee reviewing the policy will include: IB teachers, IB Coordinator and the IB School Counselor. The review commences in the Spring Semester for the upcoming school year.

Communication of the Policy

The final version is communicated through the following resources:

  • The Special Education Needs/Inclusive Education Policy is placed on the IB at Bartow High School Website in July.
  • A link to the Special Education Needs/Inclusive Education Policy is delivered electronically through our weekly IB Constant Contact for one month when school starts.
  • Incoming 9th graders are given a clearly worded presentation during their Spring Orientation which occurs in April or May of their 8th grade year. The policy is part of the resources provided to the parents during this orientation.
  • Copies of the policy are available for review in the IB Office.

BHS/IB Dress Code Information

Administration has the final approval on dress code clarifications.

The Bartow High School/IB dress code has been established to help students demonstrate consideration and respect for themselves and others, as well as develop employability and life skills. This dress code will be enforced in compliance with the Polk County Public Schools Code of Student Conduct. Updated 9.9.2021

  • School Issued identification badges (ID badges) must be worn above the waist. Either around the neck on a lanyard or clipped at the collar throughout the school day. ID badges are considered part of our Dress Code.
  • Free ID badges will be issued at the beginning of the school year. If lost, a badge will be re-printed for $5.

Bottoms:

  • Pants: Pants shall be worn so that the waistband is worn at the waist and not below the waist. Cut-off jeans and cut-off sweatpants are not allowed. No clothing can be worn that exposes undergarments or body parts in an indecent manner. Each student is responsible for compliance with appropriate dress. Jeans with tears, rips, frays are allowed if skin is not showing above the knee.
  • Shorts: All students may wear hemmed walking shorts or Bermuda shorts and students may wear shorts, provided that such shorts or skorts are worn at fingertip length with elbows locked. Spandex-style bottoms must be worn with a covered top at fingertip length with elbows locked. Short shorts, running shorts, and see-through boxer-type shorts are not  Jean shorts with tears, rips, frays are allowed if skin is not showing above the knee.

Shirts:

Shirts should be worn where the waistband hem of the shirts cover the torso. Shirts must cover shoulders. No clothing can be worn that exposes undergarments or body parts in an indecent manner. Overshirts must be buttoned up to cover undershirts that expose the torso.

Skirts and Dresses:

The hem of skirts or dresses shall be worn at fingertip length with elbows locked.

Masks:

Polk County Public Schools has adopted a “mask optional” policy and no longer requires students or staff to wear face coverings while attending school functions. The CDC still recommends unvaccinated people wear face coverings when social distancing is not possible. If a face covering is worn it must comply with general dress code and school uniform requirements.

Shoes:

Closed-toed shoes are encouraged. Students in BHS Academy classes are required to wear closed-toed shoes as a safety requirement. Each academy will share specific uniform and shoe requirements specific to that program.

Students are permitted to wear the following:

  • Pants with the waistband worn at the waist
  • Jeans with tears, rips, frays are allowed if skin is not showing above the knee
  • Shorts must be at fingertip length (Elbows Locked)
  • Skirts and dresses must be at fingertip length (Elbows Locked)
  • Shirts must cover shoulders and torso

Students are not permitted to wear the follow:

Students are not permitted to wear the following:

Clothing (including bandanas), jewelry (including body piercing jewelry and “grills”), buttons, haircuts, tattoos, or other attire or markings which are offensive, suggestive, disruptive, or indecent such as:

    1. Clothing associated with gangs.
    2. Clothing encouraging the use of tobacco, drugs, alcohol, or violence.
    3. Clothing associated with discrimination on the basis of age, color, handicap, national origin, marital status, race, religion, or sex.
    4. Clothing exposing the torso or upper thighs such as see-through garments, mini-skirts, or mini-dresses, halters, backless dresses, tube tops or tank tops without over blouses or shirts, spaghetti strap garments without over-blouses or shirts, bare midriff outfits, or shirts or blouses tied at the midriff.
    5. Clothing not properly fastened.
    6. Clothing or outer garments traditionally designed as undergarments such as boxer shorts, bloomers, tights, hosiery, and sleepwear (pajamas are not allowed).
    7. Clothing or footwear that is construed by administration as hazardous or dangerous to the health of the student or others
    8. Overalls – any bibbed pants or shorts (with an inseam).
    9. Trench coats.
    10. Hooded sweatshirts are acceptable, but hoods may not be worn during school hours.

Dress Expectations

Prepare attire, backpack and ID the night before.

Respect the school dress code.

Integrity to keeping attire World Class.

Dedicate to wearing dress appropriately.

Engage by presenting yourself dressed and ready to work.

 

ADMINISTRATION HAS THE FINAL APPROVAL ON DRESS CODE CLARIFICATIONS